Friday, April 20, 2007

Is There a Doctor in the House?

I have been corrected (in the most gracious and loving way) by Dr. Amy at Good Soil. I told my children that the little flappy thing hanging down in the back of their throat was the epiglottis when in fact it is called the UVULA!! I have to admit the picture I posted confused me but at the time it was the best I could find and I was absolutely convinced that it was called the epiglottis. It's all coming back to me now, really.

CHECK THIS OUT!




















I stand corrected and will have to inform my two daughters who were so curious about that little thing in the back of their throats.

**Amy, remind me of your training. I know attended med school and I think you did your residency in OB/GYN but later decided to leave the field and stay home with your babies. Yeah! Consider this an interview and tell us all about yourself in my comments. :)

**Amy and I have a special connection....we got to spend some time together at Starbucks a few years ago when I was in Dallas! What a treat!

*********************

Will you pray for my little Dani. She has a horrible virus. Her fever is very high and she is soooo uncomfortable. We were up all night dealing with the croup.

Thanks.

7 comments:

Donna Boucher said...

Praying for Dani!

Uvula.

Good scrabble word.

Amy said...

I'm sorry you have sick one. I'll be praying for a speedy recovery.

As for me, I went to medical school at the University of Texas Medical Center at San Antonio. After I graduated from there Bud and I moved to Washington D.C. where I entered the Ob/Gyn residency program at Georgetown, 7 months pregnant.

After Luke was born, I knew I couldn't work those hours (it was about 100 or so per week), so I went back for about two months just doing night call so as not to ruin the other interns' lives.

Fortunately, Ob/Gyn is a fairly competitive field and they were able to find someone to take my spot pretty quickly. I took the rest of the year off to stay home with Luke, then started up the next year in the Georgetown Family Practice program.

It was only a short time before I knew I only wanted to be home. I completed that year of training and I haven't practiced medicine since (except on a mission trip and to correct people on anatomy issues ;) ). It will be seven years next month. Best decision I ever made next to marrying my husband.

Anyhoo, uvula, epiglottis - both very fun word, no?

Health Geek said...

when I was trying to think of what they called Nick's condition, I kept thinking it was di-something, something-uvula, but I was sure I was mistaken...now I know

what is the epiglotis for?

I looked up croup in the 'health geek' book, it says hot baths and a good sweat will work wonders, you have the humidifier going, right ? remember, the fever is burning it out of her...it also said to seek medical help if the airways seem blocked (like last night)...here's my favorite, cut onions, wrapped in cloth, on her chest ;}

Amy said...

Janice,

It's bifid uvula - here's a lovely photo of it:

http://dentistry.ouhsc.edu/intranet-WEB/Courses/OD8502/images/bifiduvula.JPEG

You're right, a sudden change can help with croup - going from warm to cool air often helps (probably not an option in AZ), or sitting in the steamy bathroom.

Unrelated to croup so I don't freak you out, Janet: The epiglottis keeps food and liquids from "going down the wrong pipe" by covering the larynx when you swallow. One of the Big Scary childhood infections is epiglottitis, caused by H. Flu, which most children are now vaccinated for. When this infection happens the epiglottis swells and can completely close off the airway. Bigger people don't usually get it for some reason, though we do get other H. Flu infections.

Janet said...

Thanks Amy! Last night at 2:30 am it was pleny cold, trust me.

Janice the onion thing probably won't fly around here :) tee hee

We're off to the Dr. to see if this warrants a steroid shot. I'd hate to have another night like last night. Her fever is still very high and her throat is tight.

Donna Boucher said...

How is Dani feeling today? (sunday)
I hope the doc was able to help :o)

Anonymous said...

I had epigottis in 2005, it is very serious for an adult(I am 69) I thought I had a terrible sore throat,worse than any I had had before. By the time I got to doctor he immediately had me rushed to ICU at hospital. I almost died as my airway was almost closed. After about 6 days in hospital I was able to go home but in terrible shape. Today I am fine, I had never heard of this before as it is not very common. Much prayer by friends and family and God intervened. BarbaraMcPeak